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Testing network connectivity with the ping command (1003486)

Purpose

For troubleshooting purposes, it may be necessary to test network connectivity between different components of your network.  This article provides you with the steps to perform a ping test on your network from Windows, Linux, and ESX/ESXi hosts. 

Resolution


Testing with Ping from a Windows Host

To initiate a ping test from a Windows host:
  1. Click Start > Run, type cmd, then click OK.
  2. At the command prompt window, run:

    ping <server>

    W
    here <server> is the hostname or IP address of the server that you want to ping.

  3. Press Enter.
A successful ping response is similar to:
C:\>ping server

Pinging server with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from server: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
Reply from server: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
Reply from server: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
Reply from server: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64

Ping statistics for server:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

C:\>
An unsuccessful ping response is similar to:
C:\>ping server

Pinging server with 32 bytes of data:

Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for server:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

C:\>
Note: If you do not see a response when pinging by the hostname of the server, initiate a ping to the IP address. Initiating a ping to the IP address allows you to determine if the problem is a result of an issue with hostname resolution.

Testing with Ping from a Linux Host

To initiate a ping test from a Linux host:
  1. Open a Terminal to the Linux command shell.
  2. In the command shell window, type ping <server>

    Where <server> is the hostname or IP address of the server that you want to ping
  3. Press Enter.

    Note: To stop the ping, press Ctrl + C.
A successful ping response is similar to:
[root@server]$ ping server
PING server (10.0.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from server (10.0.0.1): icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.025 ms
64 bytes from server (10.0.0.1): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.029 ms
64 bytes from server (10.0.0.1): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.032 ms
64 bytes from server (10.0.0.1): icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.028 ms

--- server ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3092ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.025/0.028/0.032/0.005 ms, pipe 2
[root@server]$
An unsuccessful ping response is similar to:
[root@server]$ ping server
PING server (10.0.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.

--- server ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 0 received, 100% packet loss, time 3017ms
[root@server]$
Note: If you do not see a response when pinging by the hostname of the server, initiate a ping to the IP address. Initiating a ping to the IP address allows you to determine if the problem is a result of an issue with hostname resolution.

Testing with Ping from an ESX/ESXi host:

To initiate a ping test from the console of an ESX/ESXi host:
  1. Log in as root to the ESX/ESXi service console through iLO/DRAC. To log in to ESXi hosts using SSH, see Tech Support Mode for Emergency Support (1003677) and Using Tech Support Mode in ESXi 4.1 and 5.0 (1017910).
  2. Press Alt + F1 to access the ESX login prompt.
  3. Log in to the ESX host as root.
  4. In the command shell, type ping <server>

    W
    here <server> is the hostname or IP address of the server that you want to ping
  5. Press Enter.

    Note: To stop the ping, press Ctrl + C.
A successful ping response is similar to:
[root@server]$ ping server
PING server (10.0.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from server (10.0.0.1): icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.025 ms
64 bytes from server (10.0.0.1): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.029 ms
64 bytes from server (10.0.0.1): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.032 ms
64 bytes from server (10.0.0.1): icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.028 ms

--- server ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3092ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.025/0.028/0.032/0.005 ms, pipe 2
[root@server]$
An unsuccessful ping response is similar to:
[root@server]$ ping server
PING server (10.0.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.

--- server ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 0 received, 100% packet loss, time 3017ms
[root@server]$

Note: If you do not see a response when pinging by the hostname of the server, initiate a ping to the IP address. Initiating a ping to the IP address allows you to determine if the problem is a result of an issue with hostname resolution.

Additional Information

Tags

connect-guest-os connect-host no-connectivity

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